Information Technology Wages – IT Talk http://it-talk.org/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 22:18:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://it-talk.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-150x150.png Information Technology Wages – IT Talk http://it-talk.org/ 32 32 Greene County Commission Signs 2022 Budget; includes salary increases https://it-talk.org/greene-county-commission-signs-2022-budget-includes-salary-increases/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 20:02:00 +0000 https://it-talk.org/greene-county-commission-signs-2022-budget-includes-salary-increases/ SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (Press release edited / KY3) – Greene County Commissioners officially passed Budget 2022 on Monday at the historic Greene County Courthouse in Springfield. Here are some of the key takeaways and highlights from Budget 2022: Salaries & Hiring – Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA), market adjustment to employee compensation and mid-year merit step […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (Press release edited / KY3) – Greene County Commissioners officially passed Budget 2022 on Monday at the historic Greene County Courthouse in Springfield.

Here are some of the key takeaways and highlights from Budget 2022:

Salaries & Hiring

– Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA), market adjustment to employee compensation and mid-year merit step for eligible employees

– Minimum wage increased by 19%

– New employees hired in 2022 will have salaries 4.5% higher than standard years

– $ 2 / hour differential for night shifts at the county jail

– 81 new positions added, mainly in the new county jail

– New tuition reimbursement plan, total funds available: $ 15,000

Projects

– Highways Department: extension of the Kansas Highway (from the Republic to Plainview), improvement of the intersections at FR 140 and FR 115, resurfacing of the roadway and improvements of the ADA sidewalks; BNSF, Farmers Branch, Flint Hill Branch and Little Sac River bridge replacements

– Over $ 1.8 million for mental health services

– $ 1.3 million for information systems for new equipment and maintenance

– $ 559,669 for stormwater projects

– Last year of the 5-year purchase contract for the county clerk’s electoral equipment

Capital equipment

– $ 400,000 for office renovations and $ 119,000 for technology upgrades to the assessor’s office

– $ 165,000 at the preliminary phase for ankle monitoring services

– $ 95,000 to the Office of Emergency Management for the replacement of an exterior warning siren, a towing vehicle and a computer

– $ 60,000 to Building Operations for special projects including campus keying, replacement of hot water pumps in courthouses and new door locks at the Archives building

– Fund 101: $ 140,578 for vehicles, Fund 102: $ 35,000 per vehicle

– $ 30,740 for snow and ice removal equipment

– $ 22,000 of new office furniture for the Office of the Public Administrator

– Increase of $ 7,500 for the MU Extension Center

Budget analysis

The total expense for all funds is $ 261,149,286. The expenditure amount for the combined county general funds (GR 1 and 2) is $ 78,573,984.

The figure below shows the revenue and expenditure assigned for GR 1 & 2:

The amount of starting funds for GR 1 and 2 is $ 41,849,528 with an expected final amount of $ 34,696,534. $ 18,474,087 is a required 90 day operating cash level per policy. $ 17 million should be specifically earmarked for reserves.

The 2022 budget is net of $ 9,090,166 below requests. The following represent unfunded budget requests:

The county remains in a strong financial position due to the added stability of the sales tax approved in 2017. A milestone comes in 2022 with the completion of the $ 150 million Sheriff’s Office / Prison project and the start operations of the new facility.

Additionally, prison medical costs have increased significantly from initial estimates, in part due to the withdrawal of an outside contractor providing the service. The budget provides for 16 additional medical staff. The opportunities over the next year will be to calculate the projected needs against the actual operating needs of new facilities.

Another important step taken in this budget was the consolidation of the LEST I and LEST II funds into a single viable operating fund. After the adoption of LEST I in 1997, the cost of the operations undertaken has always been greater than the revenues the county was allowed to withdraw from the tax. This led the General Revenue to make annual fund transfers to cover operating deficits. With this budget, enough items have been moved from LEST to general revenue so that there is no longer an operating deficit in the LEST fund.

Sales tax is up 14.6% over eleven months of processing in 2021 and has a projected growth of 2.0%. However, tax revenues are down by 2.4% due to the drop in the tax levy on property values. Total income, excluding interest, transfers or loans for the 2022 budget, is expected to decrease by 1.0% from the forecasted closing balances for 2021.

Additionally, although recent levels of sales tax growth far exceed any previous growth levels for at least the past 14 years, trend lines have yet to represent a clear turning point in declining growth. . The county will continue to monitor unemployment rates, economic growth, as indicated by sales tax revenues, and the continued influx of federal stimulus funds into the local economy for changes that could indicate a change in the economic outlook.

In 2021 and 2022, there were a total of 14 public meetings on the budget. The Commission’s decisions have been posted online for public review. All were governed by Articles 50.525 to 50.745 of the state statutes, commonly referred to as the “County Budget Act”.

“The budget process is a huge undertaking, and this year, as we do every year, the county has worked hard to develop a final budget that balances need with available funds,” said Chair Commissioner Bob Dixon. “Citizens can take pride in knowing that there is a lot of planning and dedication at all levels in the county to make this happen. “

The full 2022 budget, including more information from the Greene County Budget Office, is available at: https://greenecountymo.gov/budget/.

To report a correction or typo, please send an email digitalnews@ky3.com

Copyright 2022 KY3. All rights reserved.

]]>
Company rewarded for “happiest employees” hires 80 customer service representatives in Montreal https://it-talk.org/company-rewarded-for-happiest-employees-hires-80-customer-service-representatives-in-montreal/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 20:31:18 +0000 https://it-talk.org/company-rewarded-for-happiest-employees-hires-80-customer-service-representatives-in-montreal/ Concentrix, a company that recently ranked 30th on the Comparably list of 50 Great Companies with Happiest Employees, hires 80 customer service employees at its Montreal office with the option of working from home. In order to fill the positions, she is organizing a job fair on Zoom on Wednesday January 12 from 10 a.m. […]]]>

Concentrix, a company that recently ranked 30th on the Comparably list of 50 Great Companies with Happiest Employees, hires 80 customer service employees at its Montreal office with the option of working from home.

In order to fill the positions, she is organizing a job fair on Zoom on Wednesday January 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The virtual event is described as an opportunity for interested candidates to “get to know Concentrix during the information session, meet recruiters, learn more about available opportunities, as well as get acquainted with the culture inclusive and people-oriented staff ”in an email shared with MTL Blog.

MTL Blog asked Concentrix to provide more information on possible wages or salaries and the company responded with the following statement: “We fill multiple roles and our hourly rate varies depending on the client and the complexity of the job. However, the company says it offers “a competitive starting salary as well as incentives to build that long-term base and that future opportunity for anyone starting a career with the company.”

“Concentrix’s goal is to create sustainable careers and it offers a competitive starting salary as well as incentives to build that long-term base and future opportunity for all those starting a career with the company,” said a spokesperson.

Employees receive medical, dental and visual benefits after three months, paid training, access to coaching and mentoring programs, access to mental health partners, paid time off, ‘paid leave for the first year, and more.

A job listing on Concentrix’s Careers page for Customer Service Representatives outlines the responsibilities of this position. Essentially, customer service reps answer calls from customers who are having issues with their smartphones and computers, and troubleshoot the issues.

Successful applicants will:

  • “Greet customers in a courteous, friendly and professional manner
  • Listen carefully to the needs and concerns of customers; demonstrate empathy while maximizing opportunities to build relationships with the client
  • Clarify customer requirements; probe to understand
  • Prepare complete and accurate work, including appropriate scoring of accounts, as required
  • Participate in activities designed to improve customer satisfaction and business performance
  • Resolve basic and routine customer issues that are technical in nature; including hardware, software, networking or other designated customer products’

For the Customer Service Representative role, Concentrix is ​​looking for candidates who have a high school diploma or equivalent, six months of customer service experience and who are effective communicators in English and French. It also looks for people who can type a minimum of 35 words per minute.

However, this is not the only position the company is looking to fill.

To attend the career fair, contact Brianna Caticchio and Daryl Teves at Brianna.caticchio@concentrix.com for the Zoom link.

Customer service employee

Company: Concentrix (Montreal office)

When: A virtual job fair will take place on January 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Where: Contact Brianna.caticchio@concentrix.com for the Zoom link

Website

]]>
A solid basis for a dynamic cycle in ’22 https://it-talk.org/a-solid-basis-for-a-dynamic-cycle-in-22/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 22:05:45 +0000 https://it-talk.org/a-solid-basis-for-a-dynamic-cycle-in-22/ The economic forecasts of wealth managers show more powerful economic growth in the 2020s than in the 2010s David Nolet The global crisis has had a marked effect, causing changes in the priorities of policymakers, the consolidated balance sheets of households and businesses and accelerated innovation. 2021 brought some clarity: economies have shown resilience, markets […]]]>

The economic forecasts of wealth managers show more powerful economic growth in the 2020s than in the 2010s

David Nolet

The global crisis has had a marked effect, causing changes in the priorities of policymakers, the consolidated balance sheets of households and businesses and accelerated innovation. 2021 brought some clarity: economies have shown resilience, markets have resurfaced. And while there are certainly risks to be managed, including inflation, labor shortages and a lingering global pandemic, we are optimistic and see a solid foundation for a dynamic cycle ahead. All things considered, this should set the stage for more powerful economic growth in the 2020s than we saw in the 2010s.

David Nolet Photo by Neetish Basnet

Changing the priorities of policymakers with infrastructure and other projects now at the center of attention

Now that the emergency is over and fiscal stimulus is likely past its peak, the focus is on longer-term spending proposals on infrastructure and other projects. These plans include allocating billions of dollars in spending on infrastructure, high-speed Internet systems and clean energy, and funding other priorities such as child care and health care.

The current U.S. legislative agenda currently outlines spending on physical infrastructure, research and development in technology (for example, robotics, artificial intelligence, and biotechnology), subsidize domestic semiconductor manufacturing, and support the development of clean technologies. Other measures in education, child care and supply chains could offer positive long-term economic benefits.

Higher taxes will pay part of the costs of these policies. Personal tax rates for high-income families are likely to rise, making asset structuring and planning more critical. While the statutory corporate tax rate may remain the same, changes to global intangible income taxes and a minimum corporate tax will likely weigh on profits. However, the corporate tax changes are unlikely to be enough to offset the earnings growth we expect from sales and operating leverage. We also don’t expect the higher tax rates currently being proposed to reduce business investment.

Wages Rise, Household Spending Rise, and Businesses Profit

The aggressive policy response to the pandemic prevented a self-reinforcing slowdown and supported household and business balance sheets. Going forward, we expect continued financial strength for both. Household net worth is at an all-time high, debt service payments are at an all-time low and consumer confidence has room to recover.

Jobs are plentiful and employers pay a premium to attract workers. The quit rate in the United States is at the highest level in series history since 2000, suggesting strong demand for labor. Overall, wages have increased 4-5% year-on-year, the fastest pace since the mid-2000s, and the highest share of small businesses on record plans to increase wages. It is important to note that wages increase fastest at lower income levels.

This is evident in many industries locally here in Fort Worth, particularly in service industries like the restaurant, retail and hospitality where entry level positions remain vacant. When I talk to many local business owners they say this forced a significant premium on entry wages which impacted profit margins and also increased end prices for the local consumer. of Fort Worth.

The healthcare sector has also seen a huge impact, as positions remain vacant in everything from entry-level positions to nurses. Many of our local hospitals have used agency workers to fill positions with qualified staff, an approach that is considerably more expensive. This has put pressure on an already difficult situation our local hospitals face with a growing population, caring for those who need it most while managing the rise and fall in the number of COVID-related patients.

Sectors such as housing and autos could be leading the current cycle. Home prices have risen, but low mortgage rates and income growth keep housing affordable. This is evident by the migration of people from states like New York and California to Texas and Florida. Speaking with many local Fort Worth realtors over the past year or so, I continue to hear the consistent theme that many homes sell before they hit the market and for those that do, they sell. often above the asking price.

In addition, the shift to more flexible working has allowed people to move from nearby towns and suburbs to relatively cheaper suburbs – a trend that is expected to continue. There has been significant development all around Fort Worth including Burleson, Aledo, Weatherford, Colleyville, Keller and further growth in and around Arlington.

On the corporate side, profits and margins are at record highs, credit quality spreads are at their lowest and demand is strong. In the developed world, the financial sector appears strong and ready to lend. S&P 500 companies translated global economic growth of around 6% and sales growth of 15% into earnings growth of 45% in 2021. This operating leverage surprised investors and led to appreciation of the price of about 25% for the index.

Continuous innovations in healthcare and automotive

Innovation in healthcare has delivered powerful vaccines at an astonishing rate. Policymakers and businesses remain committed to investing in climate change mitigation. We believe these trends will continue to drive research and development, investment and value creation.

One thing is telling: electric vehicles have at least 4 times more semiconductors than those with traditional internal combustion engines.

As innovation in healthcare is about to accelerate, we believe the industry is likely to become more personalized, more preventative care-oriented, and more digital. Wearable devices, telemedicine, and gene editing are other notable areas of investment opportunity.

By examining the relationship between economies and markets, we see attractive returns for goal-aligned portfolios. Before considering any changes to your portfolio, we recommend that you first take stock of your current location and confirm what your portfolio needs to do for you, your family, and your community. When you consider our outlook for the new year, remember that your own portfolio positioning should reflect a plan based on objectives, an investment framework and a tolerance for risk.

David Nolet is Managing Director and Market Director for Fort Worth, TX at JP Morgan Private Bank. David oversees a team of bankers, investors, wealth strategists and financial specialists who provide advice on investment, philanthropy, family office management, credit, trust services, advisory services and more again. To learn more about David Nolet and private banking in Texas, visit www.privatebank.jpmorgan.com/fort-worth.

QUOTES AND DISCLOSURES

All market and economic data as of April 2021 and sourced from Bloomberg and FactSet, unless otherwise noted. Information is also presented on The ideas and ideas of JP Morgan. We believe that the information contained in this document is reliable, but do not guarantee its accuracy or completeness. The opinions, estimates, investment strategies and views expressed in this document constitute our judgment based on current market conditions and are subject to change without notice.

RISK CONSIDERATIONS

Past performance does not represent future results. You cannot invest directly in an index. Prices and rates of return are indicative, as they may vary over time depending on market conditions. Additional risk considerations exist for all strategies. The information provided in this document does not constitute a recommendation, offer or solicitation to buy or sell any investment product or service. The opinions expressed here may differ from the opinions expressed by other areas of JP Morgan. This document should not be construed as investment research or an investment research report by JP Morgan.

“JP Morgan Private Bank” is a mark for the private banking business carried out by JPMorgan Chase & Co. and its subsidiaries around the world. JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA and its affiliates (collectively “JPMCB”) offer investment products, which may include managed bank accounts and custody, as part of its fiduciary and fiduciary services. Other investment products and services, such as brokerage and advisory accounts, are offered through JP Morgan Securities LLC (“JPMS”), a member of FINRA and SIPC. JPMCB and JPMS are affiliates under the common control of JPMorgan Chase & Co

infomercial

]]>
Pay Devas $ 1.3 billion; close the chapter on Vinod Rai’s imaginary scams https://it-talk.org/pay-devas-1-3-billion-close-the-chapter-on-vinod-rais-imaginary-scams/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 13:18:25 +0000 https://it-talk.org/pay-devas-1-3-billion-close-the-chapter-on-vinod-rais-imaginary-scams/ The wages of sin is death, says the Bible. There is no canonical clarity on the wages of the sacrifice of contractual integrity in the face of political opportunism and the uninformed scam by a Comptroller and Auditor General of India seeking fame and the media frenzied more determined to cry for blood than to […]]]>

The wages of sin is death, says the Bible. There is no canonical clarity on the wages of the sacrifice of contractual integrity in the face of political opportunism and the uninformed scam by a Comptroller and Auditor General of India seeking fame and the media frenzied more determined to cry for blood than to sift the grain of the straw. The International Chamber of Commerce Arbitration Tribunal estimates damages worth at least $ 1.3 billion, in the case of Devas Multimedia, and courts in the United States and of Canada agree.

The Devas deal dates back to 2005, when Devas Multimedia, a company founded in India with former Indian space administration and information technology bigwigs, entered into a contract with Antrix Corporation, the commercial arm of the ‘Indian Space Research Organization, for a 12-year lease, in return for $ 300 million to be paid over the same period, for space on the transponders on the geostationary satellites GSAT6 and GSAT6A yet to be launched, as well as 70 MHz of the S-band spectrum to be used for communication between the ground and the transponders. The S band comprises an electromagnetic spectrum in the range 2 to 4 GHz, allocated by the International Telecommunication Union for satellite communications. But the spectrum can also be reused for use.

Devas planned to offer mobile broadband via satellite. Now, this plan is unlikely to be perfect by today’s standards. Elon Musk’s Starlink satellite broadband service and others like it, such as One Web, of which Bharti is the main player, use hundreds and thousands of satellites in low earth orbit, while Devas has proposed to use geostationary satellites. For a satellite to remain stable on a particular patch of Mother Earth, it must be at an altitude of 35,786 km. Low Earth Orbits are less than 2,000 km above the earth. The greater the distance the signals must travel from earth to satellite and vice versa, the lower the latency. Low Earth Orbit satellite broadband will not experience the kind of lag that GSAT broadband will have. But, for the time, Devas was out of the ordinary.

In 2010, India’s Comptroller and Auditor General, led by Vinod Rai, released a report alleging a notional loss of up to ??1 76,000 crore to the public treasury, due to the allocation of spectrum to telecommunications operators without auction. Even before the report was submitted, media leaks had filled the speech with allegations of scam that rendered toxic any deal in which spectrum was awarded without an auction. For political reasons, the then UPA government canceled the deal with Devas.

It should be borne in mind that no TV channel using an Indian communication satellite repeater for broadcasting has participated in an auction for the use of the repeater and the associated spectrum. They pay the fees set by Antrix Corporation. In 2005, when Devas entered into its agreement with Antrix, there were no other applicants for the transponder space on GSAT6 and GSAT6A. Devas has entered into an agreement with Antrix for a mutually agreed amount. It is quite conceivable that this was done in good faith, and for an exciting technological feat, satellite broadband far more advanced than what the technology of the Very Small Aperture Terminal offered.

Yet when the frenzy of 2G scams hit public life in India, the allocation of spectrum without auctioning looked like a crime. Instead of defending its position, the government gave in and canceled the deal with Devas, finding some procedural flaws to get it started. It should be remembered that the real 2G scam trial rejected the notion of scam and acquitted Telecommunications Minister A Raja and all other defendants. It’s on appeal. After a bench of two Supreme Court judges overturned 121 telecommunications licenses in 2011, due to alleged irregularities, including the allocation of spectrum, a scarce natural resource. Without auctions, the government demanded presidential clarification from a wider constitutional bench as to the mandatory use of auctions, as the only legitimate method, to allocate natural resources. The court clarified that auctions are not a necessary feature of property and that, with politics being the prerogative of the executive, it could allocate spectrum as needed. But by then the account of the scam had become part of the popular psyche, the government subsequently lost the election.

The cancellation of the Devas deal was not the result of any actual discovery of a scam, but of a preemptive move by a government that had been pissed off by a CAG’s innovation of “notional loss” based on sweeping assumptions and uncritical public opinion swallow this scam story. Devas Multimedia sued the government before the ICC International Court of Arbitration. Two other lawsuits were filed under the Mauritian and German bilateral investment treaties by the shareholders of Devas. India lost all lawsuits and was asked to pay Devas compensation and interest totaling at least $ 1.3 billion.

India challenged the 2015 award. In 2020, a US court agreed to let Devas shareholders seize government-owned properties, other than those held for sovereign purposes, such as embassies and the like, to realize attribution. Now a Canadian court has echoed that decision.

India should pay up and move on, as it did in the retrospective tax disputes of Vodafone and Cairn. Allowing the dispute with Devas to drag on is like reminding investors how investment in India can degrade on the basis of political expediency. We must eliminate this weakness and change the public discourse that surrounds it, not maintain the controversy by forcing one public entity or another to continue fighting court orders to seize their assets abroad for compensation. of the shareholders of Devas.

To subscribe to Mint newsletters

* Enter a valid email address

* Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter.

Never miss a story! Stay connected and informed with Mint. Download our app now !!

]]>
The impact of Covid-19 on wages is just beginning – ILO https://it-talk.org/the-impact-of-covid-19-on-wages-is-just-beginning-ilo/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 20:04:00 +0000 https://it-talk.org/the-impact-of-covid-19-on-wages-is-just-beginning-ilo/ Global wage pressure from Covid-19 will not stop with the arrival of a vaccine, the head of the International Labor Organization (ILO) said recently, coinciding with a major report showing how the pandemic slowed or reversed an upward trend in wages across the world, hitting women workers and those least paid hard. “It’s going to […]]]>

Global wage pressure from Covid-19 will not stop with the arrival of a vaccine, the head of the International Labor Organization (ILO) said recently, coinciding with a major report showing how the pandemic slowed or reversed an upward trend in wages across the world, hitting women workers and those least paid hard.

“It’s going to be a long road and I think it’s going to be hectic and difficult,” said ILO Director-General Guy Ryder as he announced the findings of the ILO’s flagship report on wages, which is published every two years.

Women are disproportionately affected by the impact of the crisis on total wages.

With the exception of China, which was rebounding remarkably quickly, most of the world would take a considerable time to get back to where it was before the pandemic, which had dealt an “extraordinary blow” to the world of work almost overnight.

“The consequences are going to be long lasting and there is a lot, I think, of turmoil and uncertainty,” Ryder said. “We have to face the reality, at least a high probability that… as wage subsidies and government interventions are reduced, as they will be over time, we are likely to face continued pressure to the drop in wages. “

But he added that it was unlikely and in many ways undesirable that the world would simply try to get back to what it was before the coronavirus hit.

“This pandemic has revealed in a very cruel way, I must say, a lot of structural vulnerabilities, of precariousness, which are anchored in the current world of work. And we have to seize the opportunity – it’s almost indecent isn’t it, to talk about the opportunity stemming from this mega-global pandemic tragedy? – but we have to extract from them, the kinds of opportunities that allow us to think about some of the fundamentals of the global economy and how we can, in the process of rebound, make it work better.

The Global Wage Report has shown how the pandemic has put pressure on wages, widening the gap between high and low wages, with women and low wages bearing the brunt.

After four years of increasing wages on average, from 0.4 to 0.9 percent per year in advanced G20 economies and 3.5 to 4.5 percent in emerging G20 economies, wage growth has increased. slowed down or reversed in two-thirds of the countries for which recent data were available.

Workers who receive wages on a daily or weekly basis are expected to receive less in their wages due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

But the numbers only reflect the wages of those who have jobs, and in some countries, like the United States, so many low-paid workers have lost their jobs that average wages appear to have increased, a misleading picture.

The damage could have been worse if governments and central banks had not intervened to dissuade companies from laying off workers during pandemic shutdowns, according to the ILO report. He said such measures had enabled millions of workers to keep all or part of their income, unlike the impact of the global financial crisis ten years ago. But for economies to begin to return to sustained and balanced growth, incomes and aggregate demand should be sustained, and businesses should remain prosperous and sustainable.

“Constructive social dialogue will be the key to success in achieving this goal,” says the ILO report. – ILO

]]>
Report – The New Indian Express https://it-talk.org/report-the-new-indian-express/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 00:41:00 +0000 https://it-talk.org/report-the-new-indian-express/ Express news service BENGALURU: Ola and Uber, two of the largest ridesharing companies in India, scored zero, while Flipkart scored the highest of seven for providing good working conditions for their employees, study found recent. The report was prepared by Fairwork India under the Center for IT and Public Policy (CITAPP), the International Institute of […]]]>

Express news service

BENGALURU: Ola and Uber, two of the largest ridesharing companies in India, scored zero, while Flipkart scored the highest of seven for providing good working conditions for their employees, study found recent.

The report was prepared by Fairwork India under the Center for IT and Public Policy (CITAPP), the International Institute of Information Technology Bangalore (IIIT-B) and the University of Oxford. The study was repeated to highlight the working conditions of concert workers across the country.

The report – “The Fairwork India Ratings 2021: Labor Standards in the Platform Economy” – studied 11 platforms, Ola, Uber, Amazon, Zomato, Swiggy, Dunzo, BigBasket, Flipkart, PharmEasy, Porter and Urban Company.

The platforms were rated on a scale of ten on fair pay, fair terms, fair contracts, fair management and fair representation given to their employees. Ola, Uber, and Porter, which is a moving services app, scored zero, while Flipkart scored seven, the highest of any platform surveyed. But none scored on all the criteria.

One point was awarded for each criterion if the platforms met basic conditions, such as grievance resolution (management), minimum wage, an accessible contract and others. Another point was given if the platforms
has exceeded minimum requirements.

“No formal union for workers”

Only Flipkart and BigBasket scored a point in offering minimum wage to workers, but they got no point in offering living wage, higher than minimum wage if workers could not support themselves and their needs. family.

Ola and Uber got zero, meaning they weren’t paying their employees minimum wages. Representatives of Ola and Uber did not react although TNINIE tried to contact them on several occasions.

In addition, these companies do not have a policy to assist workers in the event of a risk to their health and safety, did not provide clear and accessible contracts, do not notify workers of lost wages or changes. contracts, and do not have a formal union for workers to voice their concerns and make suggestions.

“We contacted all the platforms, but only some responded. There was no response from Ola and Uber after we sent them the preliminary results, ”said Professor Balaji Parthasarathy, one of the report’s lead investigators.

]]>
Opinion: The supply chain disaster is actually good news – for these 3 reasons https://it-talk.org/opinion-the-supply-chain-disaster-is-actually-good-news-for-these-3-reasons/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 13:02:00 +0000 https://it-talk.org/opinion-the-supply-chain-disaster-is-actually-good-news-for-these-3-reasons/ The “supply chain” seems to be a common answer to all that is wrong with the world these days. This is because the supply chain is a shortcut for how the world is connected – from idea to product to consumer. This supply chain disaster is real. Thank God. Human psychology, and all of these […]]]>

The “supply chain” seems to be a common answer to all that is wrong with the world these days. This is because the supply chain is a shortcut for how the world is connected – from idea to product to consumer.

This supply chain disaster is real. Thank God.

Human psychology, and all of these systems we have designed, recognize meaningful alerts when they are persistent and personal.

So what ? Then we can direct our attention to solving these problems. Here is how we can do it.

Move from cost-optimized supply chains to regional networks

Obtaining goods from Asia is difficult these days. It doesn’t matter what container ships are waiting to enter the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports, or the truckers queuing for containers to be unloaded in the yard. Tariffs and continued manufacturing shutdowns for government power rationing have added costs and uncertainty to shipments from China. Countries in South Asia have struggled to fill the void as waves of workers were infected with COVID.

Tracing back to Deloitte’s 2016 Manufacturing Competitiveness Index, the growing importance of technology was expected to shift manufacturing from low-labor-cost countries to sites with a resource-savvy workforce. digital. COVID has accelerated digital adoption.

COVID has also rewarded companies with alternatives integrated into their supply networks. Air travel was an expensive substitute for water, as one U.S. company learned in 2021 when it needed to obtain fiberglass bath walls from manufacturing sites in Asia to build and renovate customers in the United States. United States. Mexico and its digital skills to support manufacturing in the United States and Canada have allowed it to restructure its production to supply the market in the Americas while keeping costs in line. It also switched to a range of land and sea transport options to optimize alternatives for finishing, packaging and storing products.

Going forward, expect companies to rely more on suppliers from neighboring low-cost countries and explore shorter, more flexible transportation options as they seek to reduce both risk and the costs.

Companies are also changing the way they work together. Aviat Networks AVNW,
-3.45%,
a communications technology company, has subcontracted its manufacturing to a supplier on several continents. Over the past few years, this flexible partnership has enabled supply movement in response to extreme weather conditions, tariff imposition and labor supply dynamics.

Expect buyers and suppliers to increasingly partner up through physical and digital expertise to serve markets more transparently, moving away from low-cost, high-volume procurement contracts. with restrictive conditions.

Another advantage of moving from low-cost suppliers to regional partner networks is that it is environmentally friendly. Yale Climate Connections reported in August that international shipping is responsible for 3% of the world’s greenhouse gases, more than airplanes. Shifts to regional supply networks allow companies to switch between trucks, rail and shorter shipping.

With up to 85% of a company’s environmental impact in its supply chain, companies are responding to investor interest in ESG by tracking the impact of their suppliers and customers as part of their environmental posture. Logitech International LOGI,
-0.73%

CONNECTION,
-0.59%
announced on September 9 that it is taking a positive approach to the climate, addressing its carbon footprint across its entire value chain, including indirect emissions. The goal is to achieve carbon neutrality this year, to put the company on the path to net zero emissions by 2030, and beyond, to be positive for the climate.

Companies improve supply chain oversight

In March 2020, Accenture reported that 71% of companies surveyed did not have contingency plans for business operations beyond three weeks. It took a global pandemic to show us the issues with tightly-tuned connections across our global manufacturing infrastructure.

Our integrated and cost-optimized supply chains have worked so well that managing these business-critical activities could be two levels below that of the CEO and well out of sight of the boardroom.

The supply chain drama and business disruption of the pandemic has shown boards of directors that understanding the supply chain is integral to overseeing business risk. Boards have started to include supply chain expertise as well as cybersecurity and digital transformation into their modern hiring matrices. Audit and risk committees integrate the supply chain into their review cycles.

But a board’s oversight of the supply chain is more than reducing the risk for transforming goods from production components to customer value. Supply chains offer valuable business information, from a company’s profitability levers to the needs of its customers.

As options for sensors, cameras, and IoT data become more available, integrative supply chain information about a business goes beyond management’s functional Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). With increasingly granular, transparent and timely information on the cost elements of serving different customer segments, the board’s compensation and human capital committees will examine how to encourage rapid communication in the areas of sales, marketing, production and logistics of a company, as well as performance incentives within them. . Strategic plan reviews will incorporate data from a company’s supply chain integration, as boards re-examine the implications on topics ranging from technology to talent management.

A wake-up call for consumers

In March 2020, consumers quickly distorted functioning grocery supply chains, piling up toilet paper, non-perishable foods and hand sanitizer. We have created home offices in spare rooms, driving up the price of wood considerably. We learned there were semiconductors in our cars and started to panic about the holiday toy shortages in August.

It’s time for consumers to start realizing that we are distorting the supply chain and are suffering as a result.

Consumer engagement is a powerful force in reshaping supply chains.

Conscious consumerism has joined the lexicon of the fashion industry following the collapse of Rana Plaza in Bangladesh in 2013. Consumer outrage over safety practices and working conditions that have killed more than 1 100 garment workers led to the Alliance for Bangladesh Work Safety (mostly American brands) which reported that half of the 650+ factories had completed all safety measures in five years, with the rest completed at over 80 %. Another 220 brands, mostly European, reported similar results with their monitoring of more than 1,600 factories through the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh.

Beyond the impact on workplace safety and wages, consumer awareness has fueled innovation in the fashion industry and its supply chains. Mainstream retailers have experimented with recycled merchandise, platforms like Tradesy have staked online marketplaces to sell second-hand luxury items, and businesses like Rent the Runway have emerged with high-end clothing ownership alternatives.

COVID-19 has already changed the buying behavior of consumers. It has fueled business innovation in last mile delivery. Will 2022 be the year that we consumers not only get more stuff faster, but wonder how much we really need?

Bets Lillo has held executive positions in operations, finance and strategy at four Fortune 100 companies. She is now an Executive in Residence teaching global supply chain to graduate students at TCU’s Neeley Business School in Fort Worth. , in Texas.

]]>
Applied Materials expands to former Shopko https://it-talk.org/applied-materials-expands-to-former-shopko/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 12:40:08 +0000 https://it-talk.org/applied-materials-expands-to-former-shopko/ As technology advances and global demand for semiconductors increases, Applied Materials’ Kalispell branch expands into its third facility in Flathead after recently purchasing the former 100,000 square foot Shopko from Evergreen to expand the production. With more than 600 employees in Flathead Valley alone, the expansion will add 200 more, primarily in the manufacturing sector, […]]]>

As technology advances and global demand for semiconductors increases, Applied Materials’ Kalispell branch expands into its third facility in Flathead after recently purchasing the former 100,000 square foot Shopko from Evergreen to expand the production.

With more than 600 employees in Flathead Valley alone, the expansion will add 200 more, primarily in the manufacturing sector, and bring the total area to 350,000 in the three buildings.

“Semiconductors are more important to the global economy now more than at any time, impacting all areas of the economy,” said Brian Aegerter, general manager of the Montana site. “Companies are rethinking engineering and consumers are rethinking (products). These trends are irreversible.

The semiconductor plating maker has experienced significant growth over the past 18 months, adding nearly 8,000 employees across all of its branches, including facilities in Austin and Singapore, shipping to companies in the United States, in Europe and Asia.

“The demand for semiconductors is off the charts,” Aegerter said. “We are trying to evolve Applied Materials so that we can take advantage of this demand and empower our customers. “

Amid a nationwide staff shortage, Applied Materials officials are scrambling to recruit 150 manufacturing positions, with the remaining 50 ranging from engineers to procurement logistics. The company offers competitive salaries starting around $ 17 an hour for entry-level manufacturing positions.

“Our first tactic is to be the best place to work not just from a pay perspective but from a benefits perspective,” Aegerter said.

In addition to a benefit package, the company also offers employee stock purchase plans and managers strive to provide housing and childcare in the valley while maintaining employing to recruit Flathead Valley Community College students and high school students.

Aegerter attributes Kalispell’s high quality of life and outdoor recreation as a major draw for the workforce.

Mary McLoy, Human Resources Business Partner, said Applied Materials continues to strive to fill approximately 80 positions at its two existing local campuses, primarily for manufacturer technicians and supply chain logistics, and that the the company regularly hires 15 to 30 employees each month.

“We have been very fortunate to hire engineers,” said Aegerter. “Mechanical, electrical, software and process engineers. Some are from Montana and many are from areas like Texas, Boise, and the Northwest. “

Applied Materials will continue to host regular recruiting events in January.

“Our goal is to attract the most diverse talent and to be a company that values ​​culture and diversity,” said McLoy.

Some employees at Kalispell’s two current campuses will begin the transition to the new location in March, gradually increasing over the next 18 months.

The old Shopko, which closed in 2019, was an ideal building for manufacturing, Aegerter said, due to its huge open floor plan with high ceilings to house equipment, some of which reach 14 feet. Teams are busy completing construction and preparing the facility to operate a high volume of electricity while improving energy efficiency.

According to the Forbes Green Growth 50 list, Applied Materials has cut emissions by 16% while gaining 39% in profits since 2017.

For more information, visit www.appliedmaterials.com.

]]>
Senator Elizabeth Warren berates supermarket chains for price hikes https://it-talk.org/senator-elizabeth-warren-berates-supermarket-chains-for-price-hikes/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 23:13:05 +0000 https://it-talk.org/senator-elizabeth-warren-berates-supermarket-chains-for-price-hikes/ US Senator Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) Denounced high food prices in letters recently sent to The Kroger Co., Albertsons Cos. and Publix Super Markets. In the three letters, all dated December 14, Warren claimed that supermarket chains could do more to dampen the rise in grocery prices, spurred by inflationary pressures, after recording large sales […]]]>

US Senator Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) Denounced high food prices in letters recently sent to The Kroger Co., Albertsons Cos. and Publix Super Markets.

In the three letters, all dated December 14, Warren claimed that supermarket chains could do more to dampen the rise in grocery prices, spurred by inflationary pressures, after recording large sales gains. and profits amid high consumer demand triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic. . The Senior Senator addressed the letters to Kroger’s CEO Rodney McMullen to CEO of Albertsons Cos. Vivek Sankaran and Publix CEO Todd Jones.

“I am writing to you regarding my concerns about rising food prices for American consumers and the extent to which large grocery retailers are generating huge profits for company officials and investors while making it harder for them. American families putting food on the table. While many Americans have faced the loss of jobs, homes and loved ones during the COVID-19 pandemic, food companies like yours have made huge gains with record sales and profits Warren said in letters to Kroger, Albertsons and Publix.

Citing various sources, Warren said Kroger reported a profit of $ 2.6 billion for 2020, up 5.6% year-over-year, while Albertsons totaled $ 1.89 billion. net profit for 2020 compared to $ 612.1 million in 2019. She also noted that Publix reported 60% profit growth for the third quarter of 2020.

“In 2021, these same companies continued to make huge profits while pushing consumers to increase grocery costs,” Warren wrote. “I am writing to you today to request information on the steps your business has taken to protect consumers and how you will ensure that your business is not putting profits above the needs of its customers in the middle. of an unprecedented global crisis, ”she added.

IMF-Food Industry Association

Kroger, Albertsons and Publix could not immediately be reached for comment.

IMF-The Food Industry Association, a grocery and food industry retail group, noted that supermarkets were struggling with a series of high operating expenses, higher costs of consumer products packaged (CPG) and fresh food, labor shortages and supply disruptions while striving to keep products on shelves amid unprecedented demand and customers and employees alike. safe from COVID-19. Additionally, businesses have had to adapt on the fly to sudden changes and rising costs.

“American food manufacturers and retailers continue their commitment to providing the safest and most abundant food supply in the world. Through coordination with consumers, supply chain partners and legislators, the industry has overcome many of the concerns about shortages and skyrocketing prices, and IMF greatly appreciates the [Biden] the continued engagement of the administration and Congress on these issues, ”the IMF said in a statement in response to Warren’s letters.

“Families have seen costs rise for almost all consumer goods, including some items in the grocery store,” the trade group said. “The current price increases are due to a combination of supply chain challenges – from labor and transportation shortages to higher fuel costs and increased consumer demand. Grocers are doing all they can to absorb these cost increases, and we ask consumers to continue working with us as we recalibrate our supply chains.

IMFIMF COVID grocer cost changes.png

In the online resource on the factors driving food prices, the IMF noted that retailers absorbed sharp cost increases in the first months of the pandemic.

In November, the consumer price index for food rose 6.1% year on year, reflecting increases of 6.4% for home food and 5.8% for home food. outside, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported earlier this month. The BLS noted that the November hike in the home food index marked the largest 12-month gain since the period ending December 2008, with increases in all six major grocery food groups.

On a monthly basis, the food price index edged up 0.7% in November after increasing 0.9% in September and October. November’s increase reflected a 0.8% gain in the home food index, marking the third consecutive month of increases in all six major indexes for grocery store food groups.

Yet the weekly spending of U.S. consumers on groceries has remained largely stable over the past year, and the amount has declined since the storage phase in the early months of the pandemic, according to the IMF. The organization offers a variety of online resources to illustrate the factors behind food pricing, including the effects of supply and demand.

“Despite concerns about inflation, average household grocery spending has remained stable at an average of $ 144 / week over the past year, which is actually down from $ 161 / week in the last year. stronger from the pandemic, proving that American consumers are remarkably resourceful and resilient, ”the IMF said.

Consumer demand for groceries jumped 50% in 2020, pushing same-store food retailer sales by almost 16% industry-wide, according to IMF’s report “The Food Retailing Industry Speaks 2021 ”published in September. On average, same-store retail food sales grew 15.8% year-over-year in 2020, and over 90% of grocery retailers surveyed reported an increase in same-store sales for the year.

IMFFMI_Food_Retail_Industry_Speaks_2021-workforce.png

The outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020 has changed the workforce dynamics for grocery retailers, according to IMF.

Meanwhile, the U.S. food retail industry has spent nearly $ 24 billion in costs related to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to an IMF study released in late March. That total included $ 12 billion in payroll and incentive compensation, $ 5 billion in increased employee benefits, $ 3 billion in cleaning / sanitation and labor supplies, $ 1.5 billion in $ 1 billion in technology and online delivery costs, $ 1 billion in personal protective equipment (PPE) and related expenses, and $ 1 billion in non-cash benefits and immunization incentives, IMF reported.

Overall, 63% of IMF retailers surveyed said they expect sales to decline in 2021, while 13% expect stable sales and 23% expect sales to increase. On the profit side, 75% of respondents expect profits to decline in 2021, and only 10% expect profits to increase.

In his letters, Warren asked Kroger, Albertsons and Publix to provide information on their profit targets during the pandemic, average wholesale unit prices paid, and retail unit prices paid across eight product categories during fiscal year 2021, and whether salaries were increased during the pandemic. She said the information was requested to “address my concerns about your company’s decisions during the pandemic and the impact of those decisions on your customers and workers” and requested that it be provided by the 7th. January.

“Your business, and the other major grocers who reaped the benefits of a turbulent 2020, appear to pass the costs on to consumers to preserve your pandemic earnings, and even take advantage of inflation to add heavier burdens,” he said. Warren writes to the three chains, adding, “Your companies had a choice: They could have kept prices lower for consumers and properly protected and compensated their workers, or made massive payments to senior executives and investors. It is disappointing that you have chosen not to put your customers and employees first. “

Although not mentioned in Warren’s letters, the fresh-food grocery chain Stew Leonard’s also faced high costs that impacted on-shelf prices, according to the president and chief executive officer. direction Stew Leonard Jr.

“I think Elizabeth Warren is wrong. We’re not increasing the prices or anything. We have to pass on some prices, ”Leonard said in a Fox Business video interview this week. “Obviously we are dealing with a lot of small local American farmers right now. Just watch what happens when they go to refuel their tractor in the morning. Look at the fuel prices hitting them. Feed prices hit them, labor – every one of our suppliers, from our ranchers to our fishermen to our berry growers, tells us that overall their costs have gone up. We try to hold back as much as possible and not pass them on to the client. “

Customer demand for food also remained robust, Leonard noted in the interview, pointing to his busy store in the background. The Norwalk, Connecticut-based chain has seven stores in Connecticut, New York and New Jersey.

“I think half of the costs that people are incurring right now have to do with the actual increases in the prices of fuel, labor and feed,” he told Fox. Business. “The other half, I think, just has to do with exploding demand.”

]]>
Germany sees massive job cuts across all sectors https://it-talk.org/germany-sees-massive-job-cuts-across-all-sectors/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 01:47:39 +0000 https://it-talk.org/germany-sees-massive-job-cuts-across-all-sectors/ The coronavirus pandemic is being mercilessly exploited by German companies to increase their profits at the expense of their workforce. Workers are being blackmailed into accepting severe pay cuts and job losses with the threat of shutting down most, if not the entire company. Trade unions and their works councils fully support companies and apply […]]]>

The coronavirus pandemic is being mercilessly exploited by German companies to increase their profits at the expense of their workforce. Workers are being blackmailed into accepting severe pay cuts and job losses with the threat of shutting down most, if not the entire company. Trade unions and their works councils fully support companies and apply company policy.

Earlier this year, for example, the management of the Meyer Werft shipyard in Papenburg announced that it would lay off almost half of the 3,900 workers at the yard. Then this summer, the company gave workers the option of accepting 660 job cuts and 200 unpaid overtime hours a year, or losing 1,000 jobs. More than half of the workforce refused to vote on this choice between two evils. The works council then negotiated the dismissal of 350 workers at Meyer Werft and 100 other workers at its subsidiary, EMS Maritime Services. “We have succeeded in downsizing,” works council chairman Nico Bloem said at a company meeting this summer, speaking of an “acceptable compromise”.

Caption: Hall 8 of the Meyer shipyard in Papenburg (Photo: Frank Vincentz, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons)

It has now emerged that Meyer Werft will receive millions of dollars in funding for coronavirus aid, and shipyard workers are outraged. Main union IG Metall and the company’s works council are trying to hide their own role in maintaining control over the workforce by staging toothless protests, like the one in front of parliament from Lower Saxony to Hanover, the state capital, for two weeks. There are.

Another example of the ruthless stance taken by large corporations is the recent action of Baur Versand, an Otto Group company. In April, mail-order company Otto announced that it had increased its turnover by 30% in 2020. Otto is one of the country’s big winners from the coronavirus. At the same time, Otto’s management announced plans to cut 400 full-time jobs in order to save 50 million euros per year. Part of those cuts now go to Baur Versand, which gives 96 long-time employees at various call centers, who still retain older and better-paid pay scales, the choice to accept the termination of their contracts with little. compensation; otherwise, call centers with a total of 500 employees would be completely closed.

Using these open blackmail methods, tens of thousands of jobs have been cut this year – usually with the support of unions and their works councils. Some of this blackmail extends to contract negotiations undertaken since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic. The unions have ensured that workers earn less in real terms than last year. The Verdi civil service union recently agreed to a 14-month wage freeze in the public sector for workers in university clinics and public hospitals, teachers and nursery school staff, i.e. all those who were on the front lines last year!

Yesterday, the Federal Statistical Office announced that all collectively agreed wages, including special payments, had only increased by an average of 1.3% this year. “This would be the smallest increase in collective wage gains since the measures began in 2010,” said statisticians, based on preliminary calculations. With inflation already at 5.2% in November, purchasing power is falling rapidly in Germany, hitting millions of workers in precarious jobs particularly hard.

The WSWS has previously reported massive job cuts in the auto industry, which still continue. For example, the automotive supplier Schaeffler is closing its factory with 330 employees in Luckenwalde, Brandenburg, and at the supplier Musashi, 1,200 jobs are at risk in the factories of Bockenau, Bad Sobernheim and Grolsheim in the district of Bad Kreuznach.

]]>