County Disaster Proclamation, COVID Health Care Bill Withdrawn – NBC Chicago


An Illinois county has issued a disaster proclamation as coronavirus measures increase in the region.

Additionally, an Illinois lawmaker who proposed a bill that would require unvaccinated residents to pay their medical bills if they tested positive for the coronavirus decided to withdraw the proposal.

Here’s what you need to know about the coronavirus pandemic in Illinois today:

Winnebago County Officials Issue Disaster Proclamation Amid Rising COVID Cases and Hospitalizations

Authorities in Winnebago County have issued a disaster proclamation amid the growing number of COVID cases and hospitalizations in the region.

In a press release, Winnebago County Board Chairman Joseph Chiarelli declared a local disaster for a period of seven days, retroactive to Wednesday.

According to the statement, the statement will provide additional support to the Winnebago County Health Department, as well as emergency management agencies in the County and City of Rockford.

The proclamation also opens funding from state and federal sources to combat the growing number of cases and hospitalizations.

Read more here.

Illinois Representative Withdraws Bill Requiring Unvaccinated Residents To Pay For COVID Care, Says He Has Received Threats

A Democratic Illinois lawmaker who recently introduced legislation that would require people who have not been vaccinated against COVID-19 to pay their own medical bills, including hospital bills, if they contract the virus withdrew the legislation, citing division and “unintentional” threats. he received as reasons for the decision.

State Representative Jonathon Carroll had dropped off HB 4259 on Monday in Springfield. The legislation would impact residents who choose not to receive COVID-19 vaccines and require them to cover medical costs associated with contracting the virus, even if they have health insurance.

In a statement to NBC 5’s Mary Ann Ahern, Carroll said he has decided not to pursue the legislation.

Read more here.

COVID Booster Shots and the Omicron Variant: What We Know So Far

Eligibility for booster injections expands as COVID omicron variant spreads in the United States

But with some groundbreaking cases already reported, which booster injection is right for you and what do we know about their effectiveness against the new variant?

According to medical experts, the three vaccines currently available in the United States each offer protection against COVID, although many questions remain unanswered with the variant.

Here’s a look at what we know so far about booster shots.

Despite possible cases of COVID rupture, concerns about Omicron’s serious illnesses remain low, Chicago Top Doc says

Dr Allison Arwady said Thursday that although the omicron COVID-19 variant may lead to groundbreaking COVID-19 cases, the concern of serious illness for those vaccinated with a booster is “quite low” based on first data.

Dr Allison Arwady said Thursday that although the omicron COVID-19 variant may lead to groundbreaking COVID-19 cases, the concern of serious illness for those vaccinated with a booster is “quite low” based on first data.

CDC, FDA extend Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster for 16 and 17 year olds

The United States is extending COVID-19 recalls, ruling that 16 and 17-year-olds can receive a third dose of Pfizer’s vaccine.

The United States and many other countries were already urging adults to be given booster shots to boost their immunity which can decline months after vaccination, calls that have escalated with the discovery of the disturbing new variant of omicron. .

The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday authorized 16 and 17-year-olds to receive a third dose of the vaccine made by Pfizer and its partner BioNTech – if it has been six months since their last shot. The CDC quickly followed up by also expanding its Pfizer / BioNTech recall recommendation for the same ages.

Read more here.

COVID by the Numbers: Illinois’ 102 counties experience ‘high transmission’ rates of coronavirus

All 102 counties in the state of Illinois are currently experiencing “high transmission” levels of COVID-19, while many are also seeing dramatic growth in other metrics designed to illustrate how quickly the virus is spreading.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers a county to have a “high transmission” rate of COVID if 100 or more residents per 100,000 individuals contract the virus in a given week.

Currently, all 102 counties in Illinois have reached this threshold, according to the latest data from the IDPH and CDC, and no state is currently less than 208 cases per 100,000 population.

Read more here.

Which vaccine is right for you? What to know because Omicron is spreading, boosters are increasing

From efficacy against the omicron variant to booster shots and more, how do COVID vaccines compare and which one is right for you?

There are various reasons why a person may choose a particular vaccine, but according to medical experts, the most important thing is to get the vaccine and get a booster dose.

“The big difference is not which vaccine it is vaccinated or not vaccinated,” Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady said in a Facebook Live Tuesday. “So I hope if there are people who have been waiting but are now worried about omicron, you know, this is definitely the time.”

Yet, this is a question many ask themselves as they prepare for their vaccination.

According to medical experts, the three vaccines currently available in the United States each offer protection against COVID.

Here’s a breakdown of what we know so far about each vaccine.


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